Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2019

HPS 0427       Myth and Science  (2194-28190)

Dr. Jason Rampelt
Tu & Th 11:00a.m.-12:15p.m.
cross-listed with CLASS 0330/28791

Some of the oldest written texts reveal that humans have always told stories to explain the world around them. When those stories are ancient, we call them myths; when they are recent, we call them science. This course will examine primary source texts from ancient Assyrian and Babylonian civilizations through the Greeks to about the 4th century BC. Authors studied will include the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, as well as several authors in astronomy, mathematics, and medicine, including Euclid, Archimedes, and the Hippocratic texts. Key questions addressed: How have concepts of the cosmos changed through the period studied? What is the difference between myth and science? What is the place of divinity in past and present thinking? What roles do history and culture play in conceptions of the natural world?

HPS 0515       Magic, Medicine and Science  (2194-11498)                                                                                                                              

George Borg
Thursday 6:00p.m.8:30p.m.
cross-listed with HIST 0089/11497

Science is the result of a long process of formation starting in Antiquity and culminating in the late seventeenth century with the so-called Scientific Revolution. Before the Scientific Revolution science, magic, and medicine were strongly related. This course examines the historical processes by which science became an independent sphere of human endeavour in the Western world.

HPS 0515       Magic, Medicine and Science  (2194-22781)                                                                                                                

Dr. Paolo Palmieri
M & W 12:00a.m.-12:50p.m.
cross-listed with HIST 0089/22782                                                                                                                      

Science is the result of a long process of formation starting in Antiquity and culminating in the late seventeenth century with the so-called Scientific Revolution. Before the Scientific Revolution science, magic, and medicine were strongly related. This course examines the historical processes by which science became an independent sphere of human endeavour in the Western world.

Recitation: One hour a week

HPS 0545       Space-Time-Matter: Antique-20th Century  (2194-29223)

William Penn
Monday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.

Are the fundamental constituents of the world static or dynamic?  Is the universe infinite or finite? Does time have a beginning or not?  Is time linear and fundamental, or is it an emergent, non-linear feature of the interactions of things?  Is matter a distributed field or localized into particles? Do things exist independently or only when they are interacting?  In this course, we will investigate various answers to these questions and others relating to the nature of the world around us that have appeared throughout history. This course is suitable for both science and non-science majors.

HPS 0605       The Nature of Emotions  (2194-30757)                                                                                                                     

Dr. Edouard Machery
M & W 2:00p.m.-2:50p.m. 

This course will examine selected historically important theories and portrayals of the human emotions and passions. The course will examine different accounts of love, hate, desire, anger, jealousy, pride, grief, etc., i.e., the affective dimension of human existence. It will, decorum, and morality, and our knowledge of the ‘sciences’ of human beings. A number of questions will guide the readings and discussions. Which emotions or passions are primitive? In what are the emotions grounded: the body, the mind, the spirit? Can these even be usefully distinguished? What is the structure of human emotions and how do they function? What are the relations among emotions, personality types and behavior? Can one learn to recognize emotions, control emotions, change the way emotions affect behavior? How can one text or validate theories about emotions?

Recitation: One hour a week.

HPS 0612       Mind and Medicine  (2194-11456)                                                                                                                           

Dr. James F. Woodward
M & W 1:00p.m.-1:50p.m.
 
This course is designed as an introduction to the philosophical issues that exist at the intersection of psychology and medicine. Among others, we will examine the following questions: What does it mean to be healthy? Can one define health and sickness purely objectively? Or does the notion of disease involve value judgments of various sorts? What does it mean to say that a disease is “genetic”? Are diseases always best explained by appealing to lower-level biological details such as genetics and biochemistry? What does it mean to biological “mechanisms” in explaining disease? Should human medical judgments (e.g., clinicians’ judgments) be replaced by purely automatic computerized procedures? Are medical judgments influenced by various biases and can these biases be overcome? Are psychiatric disorders real? How should Scientists best explain psychiatric disorders? Can evolutionary biology be useful to psychiatry? The goal of this class is to provide students with a critical understanding of these philosophical issues. Previous knowledge of biology, psychology, and medicine is not needed for this class. Key notions and theories in these fields will be introduced progressively.

Prerequisites: There are no formal prerequisites for this course. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Program and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. This course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Recitation: One hour a week.                                                                                                                             

HPS 0612       Mind and Medicine  (2194-25212)                                                                                                                                               

Evan Pence
Thursday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.

Mind and Medicine deals with problems and questions that arise in considering how the mind plays certain roles in medical theory and practice. Of course, this means we must think about what the mind is. We will begin this course by looking at nature of emotions (particularly pleasure, fear, and empathy), how they might be explained, and see what role emotions play in judgments. Then we shall move on to examine briefly the placebo effect, what it is, and how it might function. From there we shall examine a case of a common mental illness, depression, and use it to examine the nature of explanation in medicine generally. We shall contrast such explanations with those given in evolutionary psychology. Finally, we will examine the some of the interrelations among certain aspects of mind, brain, and body. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in the nature of mind, medicine and psychiatry; will have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about some foundational questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is also part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course may be of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

HPS 0612       Mind and Medicine  (2194-28194)                                                                                                                             

Dr. Daniel Wilkenfeld                                                                                                                                                                   
M & W 2:00p.m.-3:15p.m.

Mind and Medicine deals with problems and questions that arise in considering how the mind plays certain roles in medical theory and practice.  Of course, this means we must think about what the mind is. We will begin this course by looking at nature of emotions (particularly pleasure, fear, and empathy), how they might be explained, and see what role emotions play in judgments.  Then we shall move on to examine briefly the placebo effect, what it is, and how it might function.  From there we shall examine a case of a common mental illness, depression, and use it to examine the nature of explanation in medicine generally. We shall contrast such explanations with those given in evolutionary psychology. Finally, we will examine the some of the interrelations among certain aspects of mind, brain, and body.

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in the nature of mind, medicine and psychiatry; will have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about some foundational questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers.  This course is also part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course may be of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

HPS 0612       Mind and Medicine  (2194-30768)                                                                                                                             

Dr. Daniel Wilkenfeld                                                                                                                                                               
Wednesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.

Mind and Medicine deals with problems and questions that arise in considering how the mind plays certain roles in medical theory and practice.  Of course, this means we must think about what the mind is. We will begin this course by looking at nature of emotions (particularly pleasure, fear, and empathy), how they might be explained, and see what role emotions play in judgments.  Then we shall move on to examine briefly the placebo effect, what it is, and how it might function.  From there we shall examine a case of a common mental illness, depression, and use it to examine the nature of explanation in medicine generally. We shall contrast such explanations with those given in evolutionary psychology. Finally, we will examine the some of the interrelations among certain aspects of mind, brain, and body.

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in the nature of mind, medicine and psychiatry; will have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about some foundational questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers.  This course is also part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course may be of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

HPS 0613       Morality and Medicine  (2194-25796)                                                                                                                                   

Dana Matthiessen 
Monday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers.  In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios.  Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently.  The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

HPS 0613       Morality and Medicine  (2194-25611)                                                                                                                                     

David Colaco                                                                                                                                                                   
Tuesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers.  In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios.  Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently.  The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

HPS 0613       Morality and Medicine-CGS  (2194-24809)                                                                                               

Haixin Dang                                                                                                                                                                 
Wednesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers.  In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios.  Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently.  The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

HPS 0613       Morality and Medicine  (2194-29842)                                                                                                                         

Dr. Daniel Wilkenfeld                                                                                                                                                                 
Tu & Th 1:00p.m.-2:15p.m.

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers.  In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios.  Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently.  The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

HPS 0618       Scientific Controversies  (2194-30759)                                                                                                                              

Dr. Michael Dietrich
Tu & Th 4:00p.m.-5:15p.m.

In this course we will critically examining specific scientific controversies, their origins, their persistence, and their closure.  Controversies provide valuable opportunities to examine how communities of scientist reason about theories, evidence, experiments, methodologies, and wider social implications of their work.  We will consider a number of different controversies in this course, such as the Mendelian-Biometrician controversy in Genetics, the Hopeful Monster Controversy in Evolutionary Biology, the Cold Fusion Controversy, the controversies over Scientific Creationism, the N-ray Controversy, and the Controversy over Race and IQ, as well as an array of priority disputes. Students will engage with a range of primary and secondary sources as we consider different disputes.

HPS 0620       Science and Religion  (2194-26622)                                                                                                                                         

Dr. Brock Bahler
Tu & Th 1:00p.m.-2:15p.m.
Cross-listed with RELGST 1770/26620 & PHIL 1840/26621

The media caricature regarding the debate between science and religion is predictable: the two sides are polar opposites angrily vying for alternative worldviews, the scientist representing secularism and rationality with the religionist representing superstition and ignorance. Such stereotypes are unhelpful and misleading, both historically and practically. This course examines both historical and contemporary articulations regarding the potential complementarity of religion and science, particularly within the Western monotheist faiths. Special attention will be given to a comparative analysis of ancient creation narratives, contributions to science by people of faith, religious responses to evolutionary biology, and the potential problems scientific discovery raises for religious devotion and interpreting religious texts. We will also consider practical, contemporary debates including what neuroscience can tell us about religious practices, how religion might respond to climate change, and how racism and misogyny have historically shaped scientific research.

HPS 0621       Problem Solving: How Science Works  (2194-29894)                                                                                               

Kathleen Creel                                                                                                                                                       
M & W 4:00p.m.-5:15p.m.

A scientist announces that the sun contains a new, so far unknown chemical element, even though there is no hope of getting a sample. Another is sure that a famous predecessor has faked his data, even though he has seen nothing but the perfect, published results. Astonishingly, both claims prove to be sober and sound.  We will explore the approaches and methods that make such miracles part of the routine of everyday science. This course is intended for students with little or no background in science.

HPS 1623       Death, & Healthcare Profession-UHC  (2194-26639)                                                                                                     

Weinkle, Jonathan
Thursday 8:15a.m.-10:45a.m.
Cross-listed with RELGST 1725/25129

The American culture of the 20th and 21st centuries has been called not death-defying, but death-denying. It is often said that America is the only place in the world that treats death as optional. Once upon a time, we could not have open, public conversations about breast cancer, because the word could not be uttered aloud. In many places, it is just as hard today to have an open, public conversation about death and dying. This phenomenon is not just a social more; it affects the practice of many professions and entire segments of our economy and society. This course explores our individual and cultural reactions to mortality, religious ideas about death, the ways in which dying in today’s America is different from dying throughout history or elsewhere in the world, and the responses of a variety of professions, both within the field of healthcare and beyond, to their encounters with people in the various stages of dying. Students will be asked, at turns, to be scientific, philosophical, clinical, analytical, and emotional in encountering the concepts and material presented here. This should be a true interdisciplinary experience.

HPS 1625       Philosophy of Medicine  (2194-30772)                                                                                                                             

Dr. Anya Plutynski                                                                                                                                                 
Tu & Th 8:00a.m.-9:15a.m.

Philosophy of medicine is an investigation into what doctors know, and how they know it.  The practice of medicine relies on concepts, theories, inferences, and policies that are complicated and controversial. This course will explore several core examples, some torn from recent headlines.  Each unit of the course will be focused around specific puzzles. For instance, how ought we to define "disease"?  Is a disease simply an abnormal physiological state, or is a disease a state that has an evaluative component? Is obesity or social anxiety a disease?  To what extent-if at all-ought race to play a role in clinician's assessments of the appropriate course of care?  What sort of evidence is required to justify inferences about the effectiveness of medical interventions? How ought clinicians and patients to make decisions when the benefits and risks are uncertain?  This course is about conceptual, metaphysical, epistemological, and practical, political questions that arise in medicine and the biomedical sciences (not medical ethics, narrowly understood). This course is intended to be of special interest to pre-health professionals, as well as philosophy or biological science majors. 

HPS 1702       JR/SR Seminar for HPS Majors  (2194-10029)                                                                                                  

Dr. Mazviita Chirimuuta
Wednesday 1:00p.m.-3:45p.m.
 
This is a "capstone" course for undergraduate majors in history and philosophy of science, intended to round out a major's studies in the field.
We will review some core issues in philosophy of science, relating them to episodes in history of science. Seminar members will be led through the process of developing similar case studies of their own.
This seminar is for HPS Undergraduate Majors in their Junior or Senior Year.        
Prerequisites:  Must be an HPS major in junior or senior year.

HPS 1703       Writing Workshop for HPS Majors  (2194-10030)                                                                                           

Dr. Mazviita Chirimuuta
Wednesday 1:00p.m.-3:45p.m.
 
This writing workshop is designed to introduce HPS majors to the methods and standards of good scholarly writing in History and Philosophy of Science. It will be offered to HPS majors only in conjunction with HPS 1702, JR/SR Seminar. Evaluation will be based on two short papers that will be rewritten on the basis of the instructor's comments.

This Writing Workshop is for HPS Undergrad Majors in Junior or Senior Year.   


Past Semesters

Fall 2018

HPS 0410     Einstein: Modern Science & Surprises

Dr. John D. Norton
M & W 11:00a.m.-11:50a.m.

Do astronauts age more slowly?  Can a finite universe have no edge?  Is time travel possible?  Can time have a beginning?  Does the moon change because a mouse looks at it?  Surprisingly, modern science answers yes to all these questions.  This course provides simple-to-understand explanations of these and other related questions, their broader philosophical significance and their histories.  The course is suitable for students with no science background but with an interest in the world of modern science.

Recitation: One hour per week

HPS 0427     Myth and Science

Dr. Jason Rampelt
Wednesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
cross-listed with CLASS 0330/27826

Some of the oldest written texts reveal that humans have always told stories to explain the world around them. When those stories are ancient, we call them myths; when they are recent, we call them science. This course will examine primary source texts from ancient Assyrian and Babylonian civilizations through the Greeks to about the 4th century BC. Authors studied will include the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, as well as several authors in astronomy, mathematics, and medicine, including Euclid, Archimedes, and the Hippocratic texts. Key questions addressed: How have concepts of the cosmos changed through the period studied? What is the difference between myth and science? What is the place of divinity in past and present thinking? What roles do history and culture play in conceptions of the natural world?

HPS 0430     Galileo & Creation of Modern Science

Dr. Paolo Palmieri
T & H 11:00a.m.-12:15p.m.

The Italian physicist and astronomer Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) was the decisive figure in the rise of modern science. First, he ushered in a new era in astronomy when he aimed a 30-powered telescope at the sky in 1610. Second, he revolutionized the concept of science when he argued that the book of nature is written in the language of mathematics. Finally, he astounded the theologians, who eventually condemned him to life imprisonment, when he claimed that the scientist's search for the truth cannot be constrained by religious authority. This course will study Galileo in the broader intellectual, social, and religious context of early modern Europe.

HPS 0515     Magic, Medicine and Science

Creel, Kathleen
Tuesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
cross-listed with HIST 0089/19238

This course will consider some of the most important lines of thought in Western intellectual history, from the Ancient Greeks to the Scientific Revolution. We will begin briefly with ancient Greek speculations in cosmology, natural philosophy, and medicine. Then we will examine how they develop through the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance. These include, among other topics, the magical, alchemical, and astrological traditions that flourished from Antiquity through the 17th century. In the second half of the course will focus on the exciting intellectual transformations in 17th-century Britain and Europe, which constitute the beginnings of modern science. The great scientific achievements of figures such as Galileo, Kepler, Copernicus, Descartes, Boyle, and Newton will be discussed. In this course, students will gain a clear understanding of the multi-dimensional origins of modern science.

HPS 0515     Magic, Medicine and Science

Dana Matthiessen
Wednesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
cross-listed with HIST 0089/29638

This course will consider some of the most important lines of thought in Western intellectual history, from the Ancient Greeks to the Scientific Revolution. We will begin briefly with ancient Greek speculations in cosmology, natural philosophy, and medicine. Then we will examine how they develop through the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance. These include, among other topics, the magical, alchemical, and astrological traditions that flourished from Antiquity through the 17th century. In the second half of the course will focus on the exciting intellectual transformations in 17th-century Britain and Europe, which constitute the beginnings of modern science. The great scientific achievements of figures such as Galileo, Kepler, Copernicus, Descartes, Boyle, and Newton will be discussed. In this course, students will gain a clear understanding of the multi-dimensional origins of modern science.

HPS 0611     Principles of Scientific Reasoning

Tyler Ahlstrom
Monday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.

The course will provide students with elementary logic skills and an understanding of scientific arguments.  Ours is an increasingly scientific and technical society.  In both our personal life decisions and in our work we are daily confronted by scientific results which influence what we do and how we do it.  Basic skills in analyzing the structure of arguments in terms of truth and evidence are required to make this type of information accessible and useful.  We hear, for example, that drinking alcoholic beverages reduces the chances of heart disease.  We might well ask what sorts of tests were done to reach this conclusion and do the tests really justify the claim?  We read that certain geographical configurations in South America "prove" that this planet was visited by aliens from outer space.  Does this argument differ from other, accepted scientific arguments?  This course is designed to aid the student in making sense of a variety of elementary logic skills in conjunction with the application of those skills to actual cases.

HPS 0612     Mind and Medicine

Multiple offerings

Dr. Daniel Wilkenfeld: M & W 9:30a.m.-10:45a.m.
Evan Pence: T & H 9:30a.m.-10:45a.m.
Dr. Daniel Wilkenfeld: Tuesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
Dr. Daniel Wilkenfeld: Thursday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.

Mind and Medicine deals with problems and questions that arise in considering how the mind plays certain roles in medical theory and practice. Of course, this means we must think about what the mind is. We will begin this course by looking at nature of emotions (particularly pleasure, fear, and empathy), how they might be explained, and see what role emotions play in judgments. Then we shall move on to examine briefly the placebo effect, what it is, and how it might function. From there we shall examine a case of a common mental illness, depression, and use it to examine the nature of explanation in medicine generally. We shall contrast such explanations with those given in evolutionary psychology. Finally, we will examine the some of the interrelations among certain aspects of mind, brain, and body. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in the nature of mind, medicine and psychiatry; will have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about some foundational questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is also part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course may be of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

HPS 0613     Morality and Medicine

Mutiple offerings:

Dr. Michael Dietrich: M & W 2:00p.m.-2:50p.m.  + Recitation: One hour per week  
Haixin Dang: Monday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
George Borg: Thursday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
David Colaco: M & W 3:00p.m.-4:15p.m.
Mahi Hardalupas: T & H 1:00p.m.-2:15p.m.

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

HPS 0621     Problem Solving: How Science Works

William Penn
T & H 4:00p.m.-5:15p.m.

A scientist announces that the sun contains a new, so-far unknown chemical element, even though there is no hope of getting a sample. Another is sure that a famous predecessor has faked his data, even though he has seen nothing but the perfect, published results. Astonishingly, both claims prove to be sober and sound. We will explore the approaches and methods that make such miracles part of the routine of everyday science. This course is intended for students with little or no background in science.

HPS 1616     Artificial Intelligence and Phil of Science

Dr. Colin Allen
T & H 2:30p.m.-3:45p.m.

Artificial intelligence has been and still is one of the core disciplines of contemporary cognitive science. It raises fascinating questions: Can robots think? Is artificial intelligence really intelligence? Could artifacts be conscious? What can we learn about the human mind from building robots? How should intelligent robots be built? We will survey the main controversies that artificial intelligence has provoked.

HPS 1653     Introduction to Philosophy of Science

Dr. Robert Batterman
M & W 1:00p.m.-1:50p.m.
cross-listed with PHIL 1610/30054

The aim of this course is to provide a broad survey of some fundamental questions in philosophy of science, and to cultivate your ability to think through these difficult questions in a clear and critical way. The course is divided in three main parts. In the first part, we explore the questions: "What is science? Is there a valid scientific method?" We tackle these questions by looking at the problem of induction, some classic answers to it, and following developments in confirmation theory. In part two, we investigate the questions: "Is science aiming at truth? Or does it only aim at saving the phenomena?" We critically assess three main philosophical views surrounding this issue. Finally, in part three, we concentrate on more specific questions such as: "What is a scientific explanation?" and "What is a law of nature?" We look, once again, at both traditional answers and more recent attempts to answer those challenging questions.

Recitation: One hour per week

HPS 1682     Freedom and Determination

Dr. Ericka Schumener
Wednesday 6:00p.m.-8:30pm.
cross-listed with PHIL 1682/30051

This course will examine some of the central questions in the free will debate: Is free will compatible with determinism? Does it require the ability to have done otherwise than what we actually did? How are we to understand this ability? Must we be the ultimate sources of our own actions? Is this notion even coherent? If not, where does this leave us? Related questions concerning the topic of moral responsibility will also be explored.