Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2020 (Term 2211)

0410      Einstein: Modern Science & Surprises
Dr. John D. Norton          2211      30687 
T & H 11:00a.m.-12:15p.m.
 
Do astronauts age more slowly?  Can a finite universe have no edge?  Is time travel possible?  Can time have a beginning?  Does the moon change because a mouse looks at it?  Surprisingly, modern science answers yes to all these questions.  This course provides simple-to-understand explanations of these and other related questions, their broader philosophical significance and their histories.  The course is suitable for students with no science background but with an interest in the world of modern science.  
 
0427      Myth and Science 
George Borg          2211      30830 
T & H 9:30a.m.-10:45a.m.
cross-listed with CLASS 0330/30829
 
Some of the oldest written texts reveal that humans have always told stories to explain the world around them. When those stories are ancient, we call them myths; when they are recent, we call them science. This course will examine primary source texts from ancient Assyrian and Babylonian civilizations through the Greeks to about the 4th century BC. Authors studied will include the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, as well as several authors in astronomy, mathematics, and medicine, including Euclid, Archimedes, and the Hippocratic texts. Key questions addressed: How have concepts of the cosmos changed through the period studied? What is the difference between myth and science? What is the place of divinity in past and present thinking? What roles do history and culture play in conceptions of the natural world?
 
0430      Galileo & Creation of Modern Science 
Dr. Paolo Palmieri          2211     17178 
T & H 9:30a.m.-10:45a.m.
 
The Italian physicist and astronomer Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) was the decisive figure in the rise of modern science. First, he ushered in a new era in astronomy when he aimed a 30-powered telescope at the sky in 1610. Second, he revolutionized the concept of science when he argued that the book of nature is written in the language of mathematics. Finally, he astounded the theologians, who eventually condemned him to life imprisonment, when he claimed that the scientist's search for the truth cannot be constrained by religious authority. This course will study Galileo in the broader intellectual, social, and religious context of early modern Europe.
 
0515      Magic, Medicine and Science 
Dr. Jason Rampelt          2211      30832 
T & H 11:00a.m.-12:15p.m.
cross-listed with HIST 0089/30831
 
This course will consider some of the most important lines of thought in Western intellectual history, from the Ancient Greeks to the Scientific Revolution. We will begin briefly with ancient Greek thought in cosmology, natural philosophy, and medicine. Then we will examine how they developed through Late Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and into the Renaissance. These include, among other topics, the magical, alchemical, and astrological traditions that flourished during this time. In the second half of the course we will focus on the exciting intellectual transformations in 17th-century Britain and Europe, which constitute the beginnings of modern science. The great scientific achievements of figures such as Galileo, Kepler, Copernicus, Descartes, Boyle, and Newton will be discussed. In this course, students will gain a clear understanding of the multi-dimensional origins of modern science.
 
0515      Magic, Medicine and Science
Dr. Paolo Palmieri          2211      27908
M & W 12:00p.m.-1:15p.m.
cross-listed with HIST 0089/27909
 
This class traces the history of the scientific revolution from feminist and ecological perspectives. Questions are explored regarding the emergence of modern science, medicine, and the history of magical thinking. The mechanistic world view underlying modern science sanctioned the exploitation of nature, unrestrained commercialism, ecological risk, and the  subordination of women. The course examines historical and philosophical problems raised by the mechanistic worldview. There are no prerequisites.   
 
 
0545      Space, Time and Matter
William Penn          2211     31714
Wednesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
 
In this course we will think carefully about our relationship to the environment. Topics covered include the history of environmentalism, the nature and value of biodiversity, uncertainty in scientific modeling, and the global implications of climate change. Students will develop skills needed to critically evaluate scientific and ethical arguments and to engage with differing viewpoints about these pressing issues.
 
0611      Principles of Scientific Reasoning
Dr. Marian Gilton          2211    11546
T & H 8:00a.m.-9:15p.m.
 
This class explores the logical principles of scientific reasoning. We will systematically develop formal tools from both deductive and inductive logic. We will then use the tools to discuss the ways in which deductive and inductive inference patterns are using in scientific reasoning. The heart of the class is in the process of each student using their understanding of these formal methods of deductive and inductive logic to develop their own views on the nature of scientific reasoning. To do this, students will read and discuss articles in philosophy of science.  Topics will include the relationship between theoretical and experimental science, the aims of science, and the intellectual virtues fitting to scientific practice. One hour per week recitation is required. 
 
0611      Principles of Scientific Reasoning 
J.P. Gamboa          2211      30840
Monday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
 
This course provides an introduction to scientific methods and reasoning. Students will learn the basics of logic, probability, statistics, and how they are applied in science. Practicing these skills will help students understand scientific information and critically evaluate scientific claims. Throughout the course, we will analyze methods and reasoning in examples taken from various fields of science. No background in philosophy or science is required.
 
0612      Mind and Medicine
Mahi Hardalupas          2211   25305 
M & W 9:30a.m.-10:45a.m.
 
Medicine is one of our most important institutions affecting all of our lives but it is bound up with many foundational and conceptual assumptions that can be engaged with critically. This course deals with the fundamental problems and questions that arise when considering the nature of health, disease, mental illness and medicine itself. Through class discussion, analyzing texts and writing assignments, we will explore the following questions among others: What is the purpose of medicine? Can we define health and disease objectively or do these notions involve value judgments? How does being ill change someone’s experience of the world and what does this mean for clinical practice? What biases affect medical judgment? Should clinicians’ judgment be replaced by automated procedures using machine learning? How can we best define, describe and explain psychiatric disorders? Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medicine and psychiatry; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about foundational questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and patients.
Previous knowledge of biology, neuroscience, or medicine is not needed for this class. There are no formal prerequisites for this course. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Program, and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. This course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students. 
 
0613      Morality and Medicine
Dr. Sandra D. Mitchell          2211      11388 
M & W 2:00p.m.-2:50p.m. 
 
Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.
Recitation: One hour per week
 
0613      Morality and Medicine-CGS
Jacob Neal          2211      23500 
M 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
 
Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.
 
0613      Morality and Medicine 
Bixin Guo          2211      26432
T & H 1:00p.m.-2:15p.m.
 
Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include concepts of disease, health, and well being; reproductive issues; psychiatric issues; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; euthanasia; global justice and healthcare. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.
 
                                                                                                    
0613      Morality and Medicine
Evan Pence          2211      30845
W 6:00p.m.8:30p.m.  
 
Each of us in this course will be directly confronted at some point with difficult biomedical and bioethical choices concerning our own lives, the lives of family members, or the lives of patients under our care. This course is designed to improve your decision-making ability in these contexts, and also improve your reasoning about ethical issues that arise in the context of medicine and healthcare more broadly. We will discuss and analyze various philosophical frameworks, which will help you to identify the values you find most important and determine how to apply them to specific biomedical and bioethical cases. In this course, we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered include beginning and end of life decisions, the role of race and sex in medicine, human experimentation and emerging technologies, and equity and justice in the context of global health and access to healthcare. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics, and they will have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret arguments. Moreover, this course will help students develop written and oral skills that will enable them to think and express themselves clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and/or consumers. There are no prerequisites for this course and no background knowledge of either philosophy or medicine is assumed. A core course in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine certificate, it is likely to be of interest to pre-medical and pre-healthcare students.
 
0618      Scientific Controversies
Dr. Michael Dietrich          2211      30846 
T & H 2:00p.m.-3:15p.m.
 
In this course we will critically examining specific scientific controversies, their origins, their persistence, and their closure.  Controversies provide valuable opportunities to examine how communities of scientist reason about theories, evidence, experiments, methodologies, and wider social implications of their work.  We will consider a number of different controversies in this course, such as the Mendelian-Biometrician controversy in Genetics, the Hopeful Monster Controversy in Evolutionary Biology, the Cold Fusion Controversy, the controversies over Scientific Creationism, the N-ray Controversy, and the Controversy over Race and IQ, as well as an array of priority disputes. Students will engage with a range of primary and secondary sources as we consider different disputes.
 
0621      Problem Solving 
Gal Ben Porath          2211      30847 
Thursday 6:00pm-8:30p.m.
 
How do scientists solve the problems they face? Do they have special methods, different from the ones used in other fields or in everyday life? Why are their methods successful? What can we learn from them?
This course will explore these questions by looking at examples of important scientific advances, primarily from physics, and analyzing the way they were achieved. We will focus on such issues as experimental design, statistical analysis and the discovery and application of general principles. Students will learn to understand and evaluate a scientific argument and to think critically about the development of science and its impact on our lives. No mathematical or scientific background is required.   
 
0632      Explanation of Humans and Society
Marina DiMarco          2211      31715
Thursday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
 
Scientific explanations for human behavior have tremendous authority. They influence medicine, law, and perhaps most importantly, how we understand ourselves and each other. But what constitutes a good explanation for the behavior of human individuals or social groups? In this course, we will investigate the history and philosophy of scientific explanations of human behavior, loosely interpreted. Drawing from debates in biology, psychology, economics, and epidemiology, we will inquire as to what, if anything, makes these scientific models and explanations true, good, or useful, and for whom. In evaluating explanations, we’ll draw on history and philosophy of science, feminist epistemology, and philosophy of language. Students of all intellectual backgrounds are welcome in this course.
 
0630      Science and Pseudoscience
Dana Matthiessen          2211      31716
M & W 3:00p.m.-4:15p.m.
 
This course is a philosophical exploration of the nature of science. What is the difference between genuine science and merely pretend science, or pseudoscience? We will consider classic philosophical work on the problem of demarcating science from pseudoscience, reflect on the nature of scientific claims and controversies, and delve into a number of case studies of particular alleged pseudosciences. Cases may include, but are not limited to, paranormal phenomena, Lysenkoism, scientific creationism, cold fusion, and alchemy.
 
1624      Development of Scientific Medicine 
Dr. Jonathan Fuller          2211      30848
M & W 2:00p.m.-3:15p.m.
 
This seminar course provides a graduate level introduction to the philosophy of medicine, a fast-growing philosophical field. We will explore both classic and cutting-edge work. In line with the orientation of the field, we will examine metaphysical/conceptual and epistemic questions in medicine and medical research rather than the kinds of questions traditionally asked in the field of bioethics. Also following the contemporary focus of philosophy of medicine, readings are situated in the philosophy of science. The seminar will be organized around topics explored in a book-in-progress written by the instructor, tentatively titled The New Modern Medicine. The book explores features of contemporary medicine that make it philosophically interesting in a historical perspective compared with modern medicine of one hundred years ago. In most weeks, students will read a chapter draft along with other papers on that chapter’s main topic. Topics explored will include: the concept and nature of disease; disease causation and classification; cure, prevention and modeling disease; the epistemology of evidence-based medicine; the methodology of clinical trials; populations and individuals in epidemiology; medical skepticism and criticism; alternative medicine and the demarcation problem; and the medical model.
 
1627      Living with Technology
Kathleen Creel          2211      31720 
Tuesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
 
A prominent company recently realized the machine-learning algorithm trained on its past hiring data had learned a bias against female candidates and so was unsuitable for resume evaluation. But given competing definitions of fairness, how should we decide what it means for an algorithm to be unbiased? Machine vision algorithms are systematically less likely to recognize faces of people of color. Since many face recognition algorithms are used for surveillance, would improving these algorithms promote justice? Deep fakes may pose serious challenges to democratic discourse, as faked videos of political leaders making incendiary statements cast doubt on the provenance of real videos. Do the researchers developing these algorithms, often academics funded by National Science Foundation grants, have an obligation to desist? In a field filled with such vexing questions, the ethical issue most commonly addressed by the media is whether a self-driving car should swerve to hit one person to avoid hitting two.
In this class, we will go beyond the headlines to explore the ethics of technology. We will discuss issues such as transparency, bias and fairness, surveillance, automation and work, the politics of artifacts, the epistemology of deep fakes, and more. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify crucial moral and epistemic issues in contemporary technology and choose between solutions to these difficult problems.
 
1653      Introduction to Philosophy of Science 
Dr. Colin Allen           2211  16680
M & W 1:00p.m.-1:50p.m.
cross-listed with PHIL 1610/26623
 
The aim of this course is to provide a broad survey of some the most fundamental and general questions in philosophy of science, and to cultivate your ability to think through these difficult questions in a clear and critical way. The course is divided in three main parts. In the first part, we explore the questions: "What is science? Is there a valid scientific method?" We tackle these questions by looking at the problem of induction, some classic answers to it, and following developments in confirmation theory. In part two, we investigate the questions: "Is science aiming at true theories, or does it only aim at theories that are consistent with observable phenomena?" We critically assess three main philosophical views surrounding this issue. Finally, in part three, we concentrate on more specific questions such as: "What is a scientific explanation?" and "What is a law of nature?" We look, once again, at traditional answers and more recent attempts to answer those challenging questions. Throughout the course we will be concerned with applications of these general concerns to particular issues in the physical sciences, the life sciences, and the cognitive sciences.
Recitation: One hour per week
 
1670      Philosophy of Neuroscience
Nedah Nemati          2211   30849
M & W 4:00p.m.-5:15p.m.
 
How can neuroscience explain my subjective experiences? How are the mind and brain connected? Do neuroscience and psychology even relate? Is there a problem of consciousness? Can we read minds?   
 
These are some of the questions now occupying the minds of both philosophers of neuroscience and many neuroscientists. However, approaching such questions empirically does not reveal the underlying assumptions one might incorporate into one’s thinking when formulating questions, developing experiments, and interpreting results. This course will couple metaphysical theories of mind with contemporary research in both cognitive neuroscience and neurobiology. Throughout the class, we will try to answer some of the questions that popularly occupy contemporary philosophy of neuroscience debates, as well as interrogate and identify, philosophically, where and how these questions, including the research they prompt, arose in the first place. Finally, as neuroscience is a largely tool-driven discipline, students will learn about a range of neurotechnologies and explore whether or not these technologies are likely to get us any closer to reading the mind from the brain.  
 
Background in neuroscience is not required. 
 
3-25-20
 

Spring 2020

0427 Myth and Science 2204 32390 
Dr. Paolo Palmieri
Tu & Th 1:00p.m.-2:15p.m.
cross-listed with CLASS 0330/32391
 

This course teaches rational and mythological thinking, the stories of early humanity, the mysterious emergence of philosophy in Greek civilization, and the transformation of myth into science. We will venture to reawaken the deep mythological structure of the human mind, the powers of the imagination as opposed to the powers of logic and reason. We will engulf ourselves in the pleasure of fantastic stories involving early humans, gods, heroes, impossible animals, as figures of thought that are always alive in in the world around us and help live a better life. There are no prerequisites, no exams, and no quizzes.

0427 Myth and Science 2204 26999 
George Borg
M & W 9:30a.m.-10:45a.m.
cross-listed with CLASS 0330/27377
 

Some of the oldest written texts reveal that humans have always told stories to explain the world around them. When those stories are ancient, we call them myths; when they are recent, we call them science. This course will examine primary source texts from ancient Assyrian and Babylonian civilizations through the Greeks to about the 4th century BC. Authors studied will include the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, as well as several authors in astronomy, mathematics, and medicine, including Euclid, Archimedes, and the Hippocratic texts. Key questions addressed: How have concepts of the cosmos changed through the period studied? What is the difference between myth and science? What is the place of divinity in past and present thinking? What roles do history and culture play in conceptions of the natural world?

0515 Magic, Medicine and Science 2204 11379 
Jacob Neal
Thursday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
Cross-listed with HIST 0089/11378
 

Science is the result of a long process of formation starting in Antiquity and culminating in the late seventeenth century with the so-called Scientific Revolution. Before the Scientific Revolution science, magic, and medicine were strongly related. This course examines the historical processes by which science became an independent sphere of human endeavor in the Western world.

0515 Magic, Medicine and Science 2204 22254 
Dr. Jason Rampelt
M & W 12:00p.m. 1:15p.m.
Cross-listed with HIST 0089/22255
 

This course will consider some of the most important lines of thought in Western intellectual history, from the Ancient Greeks to the Scientific Revolution. We will begin briefly with ancient Greek speculations in cosmology, natural philosophy, and medicine. Then we will examine how they develop through the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance. These include, among other topics, the magical, alchemical, and astrological traditions that flourished from Antiquity through the 17th century. In the second half of the course will focus on the exciting intellectual transformations in 17th-century Britain and Europe, which constitute the beginnings of modern science. The great scientific achievements of figures such as Galileo, Kepler, Copernicus, Descartes, Boyle, and Newton will be discussed. In this course, students will gain a clear understanding of the multi-dimensional origins of modern science.

0611 Principles of Scientific Reasoning 2204 31548 
Dr. Marian Gilton
M & W 3:00p.m.-4:15p.m.
 

This is a philosophy class about scientific reasoning. What makes scientific reasoning distinctive (or not) from other instances of reasoning? To answer this question, students will first practice using tools from deductive and inductive logic. This part of the class will seem more like a math class: there will be abstract symbols much like algebraic variables, rules for manipulating them, and regular homework problems. However, the heart of the class is in the process of each student using their understanding of these formal methods of deductive and inductive logic to develop their own views on the nature of scientific reasoning. To do this, students will read and discuss articles in philosophy of science. Topics will include the relationship between theoretical and experimental science, the aims of science, and the intellectual virtues fitting to scientific practice.

0612 Mind and Medicine 2204 11413 
Dr. Gillian Barker
M & W 1:00p.m.-1:50p.m.
 

This course is an introduction to philosophical issues at the intersection of psychology and medicine. We consider questions in three broad areas: (I) Minds Do Medicine - Medical knowledge is the product of human minds. What implications follow from this? Can we improve medical science by a better understanding of human cognitive and social psychology? (II) Medicine Looks at Minds – Some medicine aims to understand and treat “mental illnesses,” i.e. illnesses of the mind. What problems arise when we try to apply medical concepts and methods to the mind as well as the body? How do recent developments in brain science help or complicate these efforts? (III) Mind and Medicine in the Clinic – In clinical settings, the psychology of clinicians and patients interact. What challenges arise in those interactions? How can thinking about the psychology of clinical practice help us improve clinical outcomes?

Specific questions we’ll explore will include: Are concepts like health and disease objective? What biases in medical research and practice result from human cognitive limitations? Does the profit motive distort medical research? Should we replace the concept of “mental illness” with “neurodiversity”? Do minds have gender? How do assumptions about gender affect psychological research? Can new brain-imaging technologies help us rethink psychology? How can patients’ “inside” knowledge of their conditions contribute to medical understanding? What is the role of empathy in clinical practice? Can artificial intelligence outperform human doctors?

The goal of this class is to provide students with a critical understanding of the philosophical issues in this rapidly evolving area. Previous knowledge of biology, psychology, medicine, and philosophy is not needed for this class; background information will be introduced as needed. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to understand and apply key philosophical concepts and tools to topics in medicine and psychology; to read, assess, and construct basic philosophical arguments; and think critically and communicate clearly about some foundational questions as health care providers, researchers, policy makers, and consumers.

Prerequisites: There are no formal prerequisites for this course. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Program and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. This course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Recitation: One hour/week

0612 Mind and Medicine 2204 24472 
Evan Pence
Thursday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
 

This course is designed as an introduction to the philosophy of medicine and psychiatry. Some of the questions examined include: What is disease? Can one define disease and disorder purely objectively? Are psychiatric disorders real? How should scientists explain psychiatric disorders and other medical conditions? How do researchers study diseases? What is the relation between the causes of disease and their symptoms? The goal of this class is to provide students with a critical understanding of these philosophical issues. Previous knowledge of biology, neuroscience, or medicine is not needed for this class. Key notions and theories in these fields will be introduced progressively.

This course is also part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0613 (Morality and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course may be of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

0612 Mind and Medicine 2204 27003
Kaveh Shahin
 Tu & Th 2:30p.m.-3:45p.m.
 

This course is designed as an introduction to the philosophical issues that exist at the intersection of biology, psychiatry, and medicine. Some of the questions we will grapple with include: What is mental illness? Are mental illnesses like physical illnesses? What is a disease? Should certain functionalities be considered "normal" or "natural" for an organism? How do researchers study diseases? What is the relation between the causes of disease and their symptoms? We will discuss these questions both from a scientific / empirical point of view and a philosophical / conceptual one. Students need not have prior knowledge of biology, psychiatry, or medicine.

0613 Morality and Medicine 2204 28034 
Dr. Jonathan Fuller
M & W 2:00p.m.-2:50p.m.
 

In this course, we will examine bioethical issues that arise in contemporary medical research and practice through a philosophical lens. We will analyze traditional bioethical dilemmas around: informed consent and medical decision-making, mental health, reproduction, empathy and the physician-patient relationship, death, and clinical research, among other topics. However, we will go beyond bioethics in exploring the ethical problems (concerning the good), metaphysical problems (concerning reality) and epistemic problems (concerning knowledge) raised by bioethical dilemmas, including: rationality and reasoning, medicalization, the nature of pregnancy, the phenomenology of illness, the nature and badness of death, and the methodology of clinical research. Students will come away with an approach to analyzing bioethical dilemmas and an appreciation for the philosophical problems underlying them. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course will be of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

Recitation: One hour per week

0613 Morality and Medicine 2204 24812 
Michael Begun
Tuesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
 

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

0613 Morality and Medicine 2204 24975
Siska De Baerdemaeker
2204 24975 Monday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
 

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; beginning of life-care and reproductive technologies; end of life-care; and public health policy. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers.

This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

0613 Morality and Medicine-CGS 2204 24096
Kathleen Morrow
Wednesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
 

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

0613 Morality and Medicine 2204 32811 
Tom Wysocki
Tuesday 6:00p.m.-8:30p.m.
 

Ethical dilemmas in the practice of health care continue to proliferate and receive increasing attention from members of the health care profession, ethicists, policy makers, and the general public as health care consumers. In this course we will examine a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of contemporary medical practice and research by analyzing articles and decision scenarios. Topics to be covered typically include the physician-patient relationship; informed consent; medical experimentation; termination of treatment; genetics; reproductive technologies; euthanasia; resource allocation; and health care reform. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and analyze different philosophical approaches to selected issues in medical ethics; have gained insight into how to read and critically interpret philosophical arguments; and have developed skills that will enable them to think clearly about ethical questions as future or current health care providers, policy makers, and consumers. This course is part of a core sequence leading to certification in the Conceptual Foundations of Medicine Certificate Program and is a companion course to HPS 0612 (Mind and Medicine) but may be taken independently. The course is of particular interest to pre-medical and pre-health care students.

0620 Science and Religion 2204 25712 
Dr. Brock Bahler
Tu & Th 1:00p.m.-2:15p.m.
Cross-listed with RELGST 1770/25710 & PHIL 1840/25711
 

The media caricature regarding the debate between science and religion is predictable: the two sides are polar opposites angrily vying for alternative worldviews, the scientist representing secularism and rationality with the religionist representing superstition and ignorance. Such stereotypes are unhelpful and misleading, both historically and practically. This course examines both historical and contemporary articulations regarding the potential complementarity of religion and science, particularly within the Western monotheist faiths. Special attention will be given to a comparative analysis of ancient creation narratives, contributions to science by people of faith, religious responses to evolutionary biology, and the potential problems scientific discovery raises for religious devotion and interpreting religious texts. We will also consider practical, contemporary debates including what neuroscience can tell us about religious practices, how religion might respond to climate change, and how racism and misogyny have historically shaped scientific research.

0621 Problem Solving: How Science Works 2204 27004 
Jennifer Whyte
M & W 4:30p.m.-5:45p.m.
 

A scientist announces that the sun contains a new, so far unknown chemical element, even though there is no hope of getting a sample. Another is sure that a famous predecessor has faked his data, even though he has seen nothing but the perfect, published results. Astonishingly, both claims prove to be sober and sound. We will explore the approaches and methods that make such miracles part of the routine of everyday science. This course is intended for students with little or no background in science.

1702 JR/SR Seminar for HPS Majors 2204 10958 
Dr. Colin Allen
Wednesday 1:00p.m.-3:25p.m.
 

This seminar is intended to be a “capstone” experience for majors in history and philosophy of Science. So far, each of you have taken an array of courses that specialize in one of other aspect of HPS. The purpose of this seminar is to give you a more advanced understanding of both history of science and philosophy of science than you may have had in your introductory classes. It will also give you direct experience of how someone with a background in HPS synthesizes their history of science and their philosophy of science. The early parts of the seminars will present you with case studies of how historical and philosophical analysis of science can be combined. They are intended to be exemplars, for the only way to learn to create HPS is by doing it. As the seminar proceeds, you will carry out a series of assignments in history and in philosophy of science that will build and combine into a final, term paper project in which you will synthesize history and philosophy of science. The historical part will arise through your researching of some episode in history of science that both interests you and promises to interact in an interesting way with a philosophical topic of interest to you. You will also present your results in a poster. Learning how present material is an essential skill for scholars in HPS. The use of posters was once uncommon in HPS, but their use is becoming frequent.

1703 Writing Workshop for HPS Majors 2204 10959 
Dr. Colin Allen
Wednesday 1:00p.m.-3:25p.m.
 

This writing workshop is designed to introduce HPS majors to the methods and standards of good scholarly writing in History and Philosophy of Science. It will be offered to HPS majors only in conjunction with HPS 1702, JR/SR Seminar. Evaluation will be based on two short papers that will be rewritten on the basis of the instructor's comments.

This Writing Workshop is for HPS Undergrad Majors in Junior or Senior Year.